How Delhi Government is rejuvenating its old canals, minors and irrigation channels to create sustainabille ecology using floodplain water #DelhiGovernance #AAPatWork @ankit_delhii

  1. Rejuvenation of old canals, minors, irrigation channels

As the ground water table of Delhi region is depleting day by day posing serious threat to the ecology of Delhi region, this project was initiated to recharge the sub-soil water of Delhi region by using flood water during rainy season through minors, old canals and irrigation channels.

In case of rejuvenation of irrigation minors, 5 Haryana Irrigation Minors located in the territory of Delhi have been identified namely: Mundka Minor, Sultanpur Minor, Budhanpur Minor, Auchandi Minor and Jaunti Minor.

The primary objective of the project is also to create facilities for the farmers of Delhi in tapping the ground water through tube-wells for agriculture purpose besides to rejuvenate / recharge the sub-soil water level of Delhi.

Scope of Project:-

  1. Feasibility study for construction of rain water Harvesting System(s) including treatment system in irrigation minors of Haryana Irrigation Deptt.to facilitate ground water recharge during the monsoon seasons.
  2. Identification of nearby sources of floodwater/rainwater to fill the minors.
  3. Assessment of hydrogeology including underground water level, sub-soil type, percolation tests, ground water level movement, fresh water-saline water interface, nature of aquifers available underground etc.
  4. Survey of vacant land/forest or Gram Sabha or water body adjacent to running length of irrigation minors and drains of CD VIII, I&FC Department where water can be release for percolation (by gradient or pumping) including assessment of land ownership and hindrance involved in such mechanism.
  5. Mapping of existing and recommendations for new pumping structure/diversion structure to take water from minor to nearby basins (Gram Sabha land, agriculture field, wells) along with assessment of potential of recharge.

How Delhi will become a city of lakes under the @AamAadmiParty: Another pilot to scale by @ArvindKejriwal #DelhiGovernance #AAPatWork #Sustainability @ankit_delhii

  1. City of Lakes

The city of Delhi is bestowed with 1011 water bodies (Environment Department) with each water body having an average area of between 0.5-2 acres and a depth of 1 m.  The major sources of water losses from any water body can either be due to a) evaporation and b) percolation. Hence, filling a water body with the required volume to compensate the evaporation and percolation loss is required to maintain the water level in the water body.

As per data available from the Environment Department, 600 out of the total 1011 water bodies can be revived. Assuming an average 1-acre area for the 600 water bodies with 1 m depth, a total capacity of 540 MGD can be stored. During the first phase, 95 water bodies have been taken up by the I&FC Dept. for revival. A total of 180 crores have been allocated by the Dept for revival of water bodies.

Pilot Projects

Pilot projects undertaken on the revival of water bodies includes arranging for perennial sources of water for the waterbodies such as water sourced from decentralized STPs created near the waterbody or centralized STPs of DJB in addition to rainwater.

  1. Pilot Project to treat Ghoga Drain along with revival of Bawana Lake
  2. Area of implementation: Revival of water bodies, ground water recharge and decentralized wastewater treatment

 

  1. Pre and post implementation scenario:

Pre-implementation scenario`

  1. Location and source of water

Less than a mile away from the region`s garbage dump- Bawana landfill- the dry water body at Bawana is being revived with treated water from Ghoga Drain. This drain is located at village Ghoga with a total stretch of 6.18 km and a volume capacity of 145 MLD. Ghoga drain originates in village Ghoga and outfalls into Bawana Escape Drain near Pragati Power Station after traversing the villages of Ghoga and Sanoth. In addition to carrying raw sewage from neighboring villages, the drain also receives dairy waste from Ghoga dairy, waste water of WTP of DJB situated at Bawana- Narela road and storm water.

  1. Pollution in Ghoga drain and depleting groundwater levels

The BOD levels are in the range of 332 mg/L indicating presence of industrial waste. This untreated waste ultimately finds its way into Yamuna and is therefore critical to treat the waste in situ. In addition, unhygienic conditions (stench in the areas surrounding the drain in Ghoga village) were observed due to presence of untreated wastewater. CGWB reports observe that the groundwater levels deplete by 1.5-2 m every year and hence it is important to devise strategies to maintain and replenish groundwater levels.

Keeping in view the directions of NGT to improve the quality of water in drains, the Dept. of I&FC initiated plans to treat 1 MLD water using SWAB (Scientific Wetland with Active Biodigestor) technology. The water from Ghoga drain was proposed to be treated on the left bank of Bawana Escape Drain at RD 9900M before out falling into Bawana Escape Drain.

Salient features of the SWAB technology:

  • Cost-effective
  • Negligible operation and maintenance expenses
  • Minimum electricity requirement
  • Smaller footprint
  • Facilitates recycle and reuse of water
  • No foul odor and mosquito infestation

Post implementation scenario

The BOD levels decreased significantly from 330 mg/L to 32 mg/L after treatment by the wetland system. Work is on currently to procure electricity supply to operate the nutrient filters which will bring the BOD levels further down.

 

Plan for Ghoga lake revival

  1. Cost effectiveness of the innovation/technology:

The cost of setting up the natural STP, with a capacity to treat 1 million litres per day (MLD) of waste water, has been set up at a cost of ₹1.38 crore. The cost of treatment is ₹1.17/KL, while that treated using a regular STP will be around ₹5-7/KL making it a cost-effective STP.

  1. Replicability of the technology:

The SWAB technology is simple, cost-effective, sustainable and can be replicated as a treatment model for rejuvenation of dry water bodies. This treatment system using wetland plants is easy to replicate with factors such as source of water, topography of land and area available being critical while designing the system. A pilot scale to explore the feasibility of using SWAB system for wastewater treatment has already been studied at Rajokri Lake and has been recommended by the NGT Monitoring Committee to be a template for the revival of other water bodies. The Ghoga project is one of the first of natural sewage treatment plants (STPs) at a larger scale (1 MLD), which would treat sewage water chemical-free and then supply the treated water to revive the dry DSIIDC lake.

Rajokri Water Body Rejuvenation through innovations in programs and practices of Delhi Government #DelhiGovernance #AAPatWork

  1. Pilot Project for the revival of the water body at Rajokri

In the same vein, the I&FC Dept. of the Delhi Govt. has, at a cost of Rs. 222.10 lakhs, successfully revived the water body at Rajokri village (commissioned w.e.f. 22.09.2018). The water body with a total land area of ~9941 m2 was initially fed with wastewater discharged from surrounding areas. SWAB technology has been used to treat 0.6 MLD wastewater and bring down the BOD to 24 from an initial level of 114. The area surrounding the revived waterbody has been landscaped with a Chhat Puja Ghat, amphitheater, and walking paths to encourage community participation.

The primary objective of the project is to create an eco-friendly ambiance in the surroundings of water bodies by creating public space for various recreational facilities for the public so as to create a sense of responsibility in the public to behave sensibly in the preservation and conservation of their surroundings particularly around the water bodies. After the success of Rajokri Water Body, the concept of which has been applauded and appreciated by various environmentalists who have visited this site after development, the department has planned a comprehensive proposal to rejuvenate 95 water bodies to replicate the model of Rajokri to create public participation at large so as to protect the lifeline of the environment i.e. water bodies.  Further, it has also been ensured that the water level of Delhi is recharged which is depleting day by day after treating the wastewater of the water bodies at the inlet point by using SWAB technology.

Delhi Government’s unique Palla floodplain water harvesting project that will build the city’s water resilience #DelhiGovernance #AAPatWork #Sustainability

  1. Palla Harvesting

 Gist of Project:

  1. Stretch of Yamuna flood plains in Delhi has very high recharge potential and recharge can be done by excess flood water during monsoons
  2. The project involves creation of water bodies/ reservoirs to store water and promote ground water recharge along the flood plains. The project is minimally invasive and first of its kind in India

Floodplains along a water body are formed by the deposition of fine sand from the mountains brought about by the rivers during monsoons and are highly fertile. The Yamuna floodplains have an average depth of about 40 m and comprise a highly porous and permeable aquifer soil layer. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated that the top sand layer can hold upto 50% of its volume of water. Therefore, the floodplains have an enormous potential to hold reserves of water and elevate the water table levels. Nearly 8000 hectares of Yamuna floodplains are present along the stretch of Delhi and sadly major parts of the flood plains have been encroached upon- for example, the Akshardham temple and the Commonwealth Games Village are built on the floodplains- denying critical space for floodwater to percolate and recharge the ground water levels.

On an average, around 940 MGD water is supplied by DJB while the peak demand is around 1120 MGD. Therefore, there is always a need to look at other sources of water in times of water crisis. The Delhi Govt., proposed a pilot project-the first of its kind in the country- to create shallow reservoirs along the Yamuna Floodplains which would be filled by diverting excess water from the River Channel and allowed to percolate. Groundwater recharge through the floodplains can significantly function as a underground reservoir which will have the potential to function as buffer water source and help tide over water crisis in the summer months. During the 4-months of monsoon excess water flows in the River Yamuna Channel. Ground water percolation levels are very high in Palla Yamuna Floodplain area. Unlike lakes and reservoirs, conserving water using floodplains is also more effective as water is not lost due to evaporation. In addition, in periods other than floods, the water levels are always lower than the river and therefore no lateral flow of water towards the river will be expected.

The pilot project was rolled out by the Delhi Govt. in August with support and approvals from the Central Govt. and National Green Tribunal. Under the project, Rs. 77,000/- per acre will be paid to the farmers who lease their land for the project. The project is minimally invasive and involves removing the top soil layer to enhance percolation of excess floodwater and will immensely help in Delhi becoming self sufficient with regard to water supply and demand. The success of this project will be a major landmark in achieving water security and can be a model which can be replicated in other states of India. The pilot project which was conducted just before the onset of monsoons have shown encouraging results as reported by the Delhi Govt. with increased groundwater levels even after regular extraction of 20 MGD water by DJB through borewells along the floodplains.

It is critical to ensure that floodplains are protected as a water sanctuary and all efforts are undertaken to stop illegal dumping of waste, sewage and also ban farming along the floodplains. In fact, studies have indicated toxic levels of arsenic in the vegetables harvested along the floodplains. In this regard, NGT in its most recent judgement has directed DDA to ensure that fruit and vegetable farming is totally banned along the floodplains by April 2020, failing which DDA will be penalized. It is also significant that the floodplain aquifers once contaminated will be nearly impossible to treat and therefore needs to be protected as a recharge zone. Since River Yamuna flows through major states, it is critical that all the stakeholders, not alone Delhi, take concerted and serious efforts towards preventing the flow of sewage into the River through construction of STPs and diverting the wastewater from the drains into these STPs as well as conserve the floodplains.

The success of the Yamuna floodplain project can be a template for other parts of India to replicate since most states in our country are either water scarce or have a water crisis. In addition, monsoons are becoming unpredictable due to climate change. It is therefore, the need of the hour, to look at environmentally sustainable ways to conserve and recharge water.

How ex-situ drainwater harvesting can utilized a previously ignored resource, recharge groundwater and clean the Yamuna #DelhiGovernance #AAPatWork

  1. Drain Water Harvesting- ex situ

Aim:

To (1) showcase that Drain water is an ignored resource that can be utilized

(2) Recharge of groundwater table

(3) Cleaning of Yamuna and

(4) Augmentation of Water supply

Methods used:

Electrocoagulation, UV Filtration, RO Filtration & Geotextile Tube bag. The Electro coagulation unit was set up by Alcantarilla Limpiar Equipo Pvt. Ltd while the RO system was set up by Green Technologies

Harvesting of Drain Water is done is done at Shahdara Link Drain (drain under I& FC Dept.) – Water flow is 18 MLD

Plant capacity: 10 kL

Project Location: P6, Ranney Well Near Akshardham, Delhi

Pilot Project of “ALETEC” based waste water treatment plant at Shahdara Link Drain

Impact Potential:

Initial estimates indicate that the pilot plant can augment around 4 MGD water supply for East Delhi. The whole process also reduces the pollutant load in the drain which in turn affects the helps in reducing the pollution in Yamuna River. Overall Drain Water Harvesting potential in Delhi is 700 MGD.

Sustainability: Solar Power can be deployed to bring down the operation expenditure.

Logic behind Drain Water Harvesting: Drain Water Harvesting can be done 365 days a year while Rain Water Harvesting can only be done for 15-20 days in a year given on an average Delhi receives only 700-800 mm rainfall for only 15-20 days.

Pros & Cons: Need less space (This plant takes only 9 sq mtr), can treat extremely poor-quality water, can treat heavy metal, phosphate and other pollutants but per kL cost is expensive than the natural system.

Drainwater Harvesting at Shahdara Link Drain #AAPatWork #DelhiGovernance #Innovation #Sustainability @ankit_delhii

Project Name: Drain Water Harvesting at Shahdara Link Drain (Water flow is 18 MLD)

Plant capacity = 10 kL

Project Location: P6, Ranney Well Near Akshardham, Delhi

Aim to: (1) Showcase that Drain water is an ignored resource that can be utilized (2) Recharge of groundwater table (3) Cleaning of Yamuna and (4) Augmentation of Water supply

Methods used: Electrocoagulation, UV Filtration, RO Filtration & Geotextile Tube bag

In this process, the electro-dissolution of sacrificial anodes, usually made of aluminum or iron, to the wastewater leads to the formation of hydrolysis products (hydroxo- metal species) that are effective in the destabilization of pollutants. The electrochemical reduction of water in the cathode produces hydrogen bubbles that can promote a soft turbulence in the system and bond with the pollutants, decreasing their relative specific weight. In addition, the generated hydrogen can be collected and used as fuel to produce energy. This treatment has been successfully introduced in removing suspended solids, dyes, heavy metals, arsenic, hardness, phosphate, fluoride, pesticides and natural organic matter from wastewater.

For the use of electrocoagulation, there are some advantages such as requiring only simple equipment, ease of operation, less treatment time, use of less or no chemicals, and smaller amount of sludge.

The Drain water is lifted from Shahdara Link Drain, passed through electrocoagulation, then settling chambers, then passed through Sand-Carbon Filter & Multi grade filter to achieve Horticulture grade water. For achieving groundwater recharge grade water, the horticulture grade water is passed through Ultraviolet filtration. For achieving drinking water grade, the groundwater recharge grade water is passed through RO filtration. The groundwater recharge grade water is then put into a pit (preferably a rainwater harvesting pit or a normal pit) for percolation into ground.

  1. EC Feed Pump

The water flowing in open drain is treated as source of inlet, media to be treated for the process. This drain water is lifted through a sewage submersible pump and is pumped to EC skid.

  1. EC Skid

The basic EC unit typically consists of an electrolytic cell with an anode and cathode metal electrodes connected externally to a DC power source and immersed in the solution to be treated. Iron and aluminum electrodes are the most extensively used metals for EC cells since these metals are available, non-toxic and proven to be reliable. Although EC is considered to be quite similar to Chemical Coagulation/Flocculation (CC/CF) in terms of the destabilization mechanism, it still differs from CC/CF in other aspects such as the side reactions occurring simultaneously at both electrodes.

During electrocoagulation, the most important chemical reactions involve the dissolution of metal cations at the anode and formation of hydroxyl ions and hydrogen gas at the cathode Fig.1,

 

In this process, the electro-dissolution of sacrificial anodes, usually made of aluminum or iron, to the wastewater leads to the formation of hydrolysis products (hydroxo- metal species) that are effective in the destabilization of pollutants. The electrochemical reduction of water in the cathode produces hydrogen bubbles that can promote a soft turbulence in the system and bond with the pollutants, decreasing their relative specific weight. In addition, the generated hydrogen can be collected and used as fuel to produce energy. This treatment has been successfully introduced in removing suspended solids, dyes, heavy metals, arsenic, hardness, phosphate, fluoride, pesticides and natural organic matter from wastewater.

For the use of electrocoagulation, there are some advantages such as requiring only simple equipment, ease of operation, less treatment time, use of less or no chemicals, and smaller amount of sludge.

The Drain water is lifted from Shahdara Link Drain, passed through electrocoagulation, then settling chambers, then passed through Sand-Carbon Filter & Multi grade filter to achieve Horticulture grade water. For achieving groundwater recharge grade water, the horticulture grade water is passed through Ultraviolet filtration. For achieving drinking water grade, the groundwater recharge grade water is passed through RO filtration. The groundwater recharge grade water is then put into a pit (preferably a rainwater harvesting pit or a normal pit) for percolation into ground.

The current passes through a metal electrode, oxidizing the metal (M) to its cation (Mn+). Simultaneously, water is reduced to hydrogen gas and the hydroxyl ion (OH−). Electrocoagulation thus introduces metal cations in situ, using sacrificial anodes (typically iron or aluminum) that need to be periodically replaced. The cations (Al3+, Fe2+, etc.) destabilize colloidal particles by neutralizing charges. They also produce monomeric and polymeric hydroxide complex species as coagulants.

Mn+                         –

(aq) + nOH (aq) → M(OH)n(s)

These coagulants form amorphous metal hydroxide precipitates. Their high adsorption properties impart strong affinity for dispersed particles and dissolved pollutants. Thus the pollutants can be separated from aqueous phase by coagulation.

The hydrogen bubbles at cathode promote turbulence in the system and bond with the pollutants, decreasing their relative specific weight. Consequently, they enhance the separation process by flotation.

  1. Poly Dosing System, Flash Mixture &Tube Settler

After treatment of wastewater in Electrocoagulation tank, wastewater  flows to  Tube settler clarifier via a Flash mixing tank, The polymer is stored in poly dosing tank which is dosed to flash mixture continuously through a dosing pump. The polymer is used to flocculate the sludge particles

Tube  settler  use  multiple  tubular  channel sloped at an angle of 60° and adjacent  to each other,  which combine to form an increased effective settling area. This provides for a particle settling depth that is significantly less than the settling depth of a conventional clarifier, reducing settling times. Tube settlers capture the settle able fine flock that escapes the clarification zone beneath the tube settlers and allows the larger flock to travel to the tank bottom in a more settle-able form. The tube settler’s channel collects solids into a compact mass which promotes the solids to slide down the tube channel

  1. Filter Feed Tank

Overflow of Tube settler clarifier flows to filter feed tank via gravity,…..

  1. Filter Feed Pump

The water stored in filter feed tank is pumped to dual media filter through filter feed pump

  1. Multi Grade Filter (MGF)

Multigrade filter is a depth filter that makes use of coarse and fine media mixed together in a fixed proportion. This arrangement produces a filter bed with adequate pore dimensions for retaining both large and small suspended particles. This filter performs at a substantially higher specific flow rate than conventional filters. Specific flow rates of 0.82 – 1.64 ft/min have been successfully obtained for treating waters containing 25 – 50 ppm suspended solids respectively to produce filtrate with less than 5 ppm.

Features

 

  1. Activated Carbon Filter (ACF)

Carbon filtering is a method of filtering that uses a bed of activated carbon to remove contaminants and impurities, using chemical absorption. Activated carbon works via a process called adsorption, whereby pollutant molecules in the fluid to be treated are trapped inside the pore structure of the carbon substrate. Carbon filtering is commonly used for water purification. Typical particle sizes that can be removed by carbon filters range from 0.5 to 50 micrometres. The particle size will be used as part of the filter description. The efficacy of a carbon filter is also based upon the flow rate regulation. When the water is allowed to flow through the filter at a slower rate, the contaminants are exposed to the filter media for a longer amount of time. These so-called active, or activated, charcoals are widely used to adsorb odorous or colored substances from gases or liquids. The word adsorb is important here. When a material adsorbs something, it attaches to it by chemical attraction. The huge surface area of activated charcoal gives it countless bonding sites. When certain chemicals pass next to the carbon surface, they attach to the surface and are trapped.

 

  1. Geo Tube

Media after treatment from EC skid is pumped into the Geotube bag. Environmentally-safe polymers are added to the sludge, which makes the solids bind together and water separate. The Geotube bag’s unique fabric confines the fine grains of the material.

Clear effluent water simply drains from the Geotube bag through the small pores in the specially engineered textile. This results in effective dewatering and efficient volume reduction of the contained materials. The volume reduction allows for repeated filling of the Geotube bag. Over 90-95% of solids are captured, and clear filtrate can be collected and recirculated through the system. The decanted water is often of a quality that can be reused/returned for processing or returned to native waterways without additional treatment. After the final cycle of filling and dewatering, the solids remain in the bag and continue to densify due to desiccation as residual water vapor escapes through the fabric. Volume reduction can be as high as 90 percent. When full, the Geotube bag and contents can be deposited at a landfill, remain on-site, or the solids can be removed and land-applied when appropriate.

 

  1. Reverse Osmosis (RO)

Reverse Osmosis works by using a high pressure pump to increase the pressure on the salt side of the RO and force the water across the semi-permeable RO membrane, leaving almost all (around 95% to 99%) of dissolved salts behind in the reject stream. The amount of pressure required depends on the salt concentration of the feed water. The more concentrated the feed water, the more pressure is required to overcome the osmotic pressure.

The desalinated water that is demineralized or deionized, is called permeate (or product) water. The water stream that carries the concentrated contaminants that did not pass through the RO membrane is called the reject (or concentrate) stream.

As the feed water enters the RO membrane under pressure (enough pressure to overcome osmotic pressure) the water molecules pass through the semi-permeable membrane and the salts and other contaminants are not allowed to pass and are discharged through the reject stream (also known as the concentrate or brine stream), which goes to drain or can be fed back into the feed water supply in some circumstances to be recycled through the RO system to save water. The water that makes it through the RO membrane is called permeate or product water and usually has around 95% to 99% of the dissolved salts removed from it.

It is important to understand that an RO system employs cross filtration rather than standard filtration where the contaminants are collected within the filter media. With cross filtration, the solution passes through the filter, or crosses the filter, with two outlets: the filtered water goes one way and the contaminated water goes another way. To avoid build up of contaminants, cross flow filtration allows water to sweep away contaminant build up and also allow enough turbulence to keep the membrane surface clean.

Potential: Initial estimates indicates that the pilot plant can augment around 4 million gallons per day water supply for East Delhi. The whole process also reduces the pollutant load in the drain which in turn affects the helps in reducing the pollution in Yamuna River. Overall Drain Water Harvesting potential in Delhi is 700 million gallons per day.

Sustainability: Solar Power can be deployed to bring down the operation expenditure.

Logic behind Drain Water Harvesting: Drain Water Harvesting can be done 365 days a year while Rain Water Harvesting can only be done for 15-20 days in a year given on an average Delhi receives only 700-800 mm rainfall for only 15-20 days.

Pros & Cons: Need less space (This plant takes only 9 sq mtr), can treat extremely poor quality water, can treat heavy metal, phosphate and other pollutants but per kL cost is expensive than the natural system.

 

Sample Test Result by DJB ( Horticulture Grade Purification)
S.No Particulars Unit Drain/STP Inlet STP Outlet
1 Temperature .C 14.43 14.43
2 pH-Value 7.3 7.5
3 E.Conductivity 990 758
4 T. Alkalinity Mg/l 347 337
5 Chlorides Mg/l 104 63
6 Oxy. Abs Mg/l 43.84 4.84
7 T.S Mg/l 804 509
8 T.S.S Mg/l 168 16
9 T.D.S Mg/l 639 493
10 B.O.D Mg/l
11 Ammonia Mg/l 45.70 23.39
12 Phosphate Mg/l 4.5 0.1
13 C.O.D Mg/l 194 38
14 O.G Mg/l 14.8 1.46

 

Sample Test Result by DJB ( Drinking Water Grade Purification)
S.No Particulars Unit Drain/STP Inlet RO Outlet
1 Temperature .C 14.43 14.43
2 pH-Value 7.3 7.7
3 E.Conductivity 990 177
4 T. Alkalinity Mg/l 347 47
5 Chlorides Mg/l 104 11.4
6 Oxy. Abs Mg/l 43.84 2.52
7 T.S Mg/l 804 118
8 T.S.S Mg/l 168 03
9 T.D.S Mg/l 639 115
 

10

B.O.D Mg/l
11 Ammonia Mg/l 45.70 0.79
12 Phosphate Mg/l 4.5 0.08
13 C.O.D Mg/l 194 6.4
14 O.G Mg/l 14.8 <1.0

From Right to Left: Drain Water, EC Outlet Water, Horticulture grade & drinking grade water123456

Delhi Cabinet waives all board examination fees for public schools; extra coaching classes for STEM Board classes post outcome analysis #GovernanceThatMatters #AAPatWork #EducationRevolution :)

Important decisions taken in the Cabinet Meeting held today

– It was decided that the Delhi government will bear the board examination fees of all the students belonging to the Delhi government schools. Now, Delhi government schools situated in the NDMC and Delhi Cantonment areas are also included under the purview of this decision.

– We have also analyzed the results of all the subjects of the Delhi government schools and found out that the students are scoring above 95% in all subjects other than Mathematics and Science. However, the results in these two subjects have gone down, with students scoring less than 76% in Mathematics. The Delhi government has decided to hold extra coaching classes in schools so that the results in the subjects that are lagging behind can be brought on par with the scoring subjects. Extra coaching classes will also be held for students who have obtained compartment or have flunked in the board examinations.

– Under the Entrepreneurship Curriculum, each student will be granted a seed money amount of Rs. 1000 to promote entrepreneurial mindset amongst students. Students will carry out an entrepreneurship project either individually, or along with other fellow students under the guidance of their teachers while justifying and elaborating on the profit or the loss incurred on the project. This initiative aims at building a thought process amongst the students on how to be entrepreneurs, rather than looking for jobs after their studies.

– The benefits of the power subsidy for the residents of Delhi, under which free electricity is being provided up to a consumption of 200 units of electricity and at a half rate up to a consumption of 400 units of electricity, have been extended to the residents of Delhi Cantonment area.

कैबिनेट मीटिंग में यह भी हुए फैसले
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सरकारी स्कूलों के बच्चों की बोर्ड फीस सरकार देगी : श्री अरविंद केजरीवाल

मुख्यमंत्री श्री अरविंद केजरीवाल ने कहा कि आज कैबिनेट की बैठक में कुछ महत्वपूर्ण फैसले लिए गए हैं। हम लोगों ने कहा था कि सरकारी स्कूलों के सभी बच्चों के बोर्ड परीक्षा की फीस दिल्ली सरकार देगी। उसमें एनएमसी और दिल्ली के कुछ इलाके रह गए थे। अब एनडीएमसी और दिल्ली कैंट में भी जितने सरकारी स्कूल हैं, उनकी फीस दिल्ली सरकार देगी। हमने सरकारी स्कूलों के परिणाम को पुनरीक्षण किया है। हमने पाया कि अन्य सभी विषयों में बच्चों के परिणाम 95 से अधिक आ रहे हैं। लेकिन मैथ और साइंस में बच्चों के रिजल्ट थोड़े कम हैं। मैंथ के अंदर हमारे स्कूलों के परिणाम 76 प्रतिषत से कम है। सरकार ने तय किया है कि जहांजहां जरूरत होगी, वहां पर मैथ में एक्स्टा कोचिंग दी जाएगी। जो बोर्ड की परीक्षा में फेल हो जाएंगे और जिनकी कंपार्टमेंट जाएगा, उनको भी एक्सा कोचिंग दिलाकर उन्हें पास कराने की कोशिश की जाएगी। दिल्ली सरकार को जो स्कूलों के अंदर एंटरप्रिन्योरशिप चल रहा है, उसमें 11वीं और 12वीं के हर बच्चे को एकएक हजार रुपये दिए जाएंगे। वे अपना कुछ भी सोच कर प्रोजेक्ट करने के लिए यह पैसे दिए जाएंगे। मुख्यमंत्री अरविंद केजरीवाल ने कहा कि इसका उद्देष्य है कि बच्चा बिजनेसमैन की तरह सोचे। पांचछह बच्चे एक साथ मिल कर पार्टनरशिप में कोई प्रोजेक्ट कर सकते हैं। अपने षिक्षक से बात कर सकते हैं। हम यह चाहते हैं कि इसके जरिए बच्चे सोचना शुरू कर दें कि किस तरह से बिजनेस करना है।
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कैंट एरिया में भी मिलेगी बिजली की सब्सिडी : श्री अरविंद केजरीवाल

हम लोगों ने बिजली की सब्सिडी दी थी कि 200 यूनिट तक फ्री होंगे और 400 यूनिट तक आधा होगा। उसमें दिल्ली का कैंट एरिया रह गया था। कैंट एरिया में रह रहे फौजियों को इसका फायदा नहीं मिल रहा था। अब उन्हें भी बिजली सब्सिडी का फायदा मिलेगा।

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